sully from the block (ex_sully200) wrote in 2k2_sex_journal,
sully from the block
ex_sully200
2k2_sex_journal

A collection of people who like to tell their stories...



Hi everyone. I figured that many of you might be interested in an Internet community that's dedicated to telling stories about the last time you got laid, or got yourself off.

In a nutshell, Kittenhate.com lets you log the who, what, when, where and why's of your sexlife. The primary goal is to amuse, inform and discuss your sex habits with others on the site, but the site also generates personal statistics on how often you have sex, what days you get off the most, what time of day is your favourite, and so forth.

To put your minds at ease, there is no membership fee and there never will be. I and/or the site does not care about or reveal your personal information to others. I and/or the site never plan to make money from running it. It's just one more oddity of the Web that I'm gratified to offer. Thanks for reading.

http://www.kittenhate.com/
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 2 comments

Anonymous

October 9 2005, 02:07:15 UTC 11 years ago

this is inapropiate
Thankyou.

Peace!

The 7 Noachide Laws
The Jewish idea is that the Torah of Moses is a truth for all humanity, whether Jewish or not. The Torah (as explained in the Talmud - Sanhedrin 58b) presents seven mitzvot for non-Jews to observe. These seven laws are the pillars of human civilization, and are named the "Seven Laws of Noah," since all humans are descended from Noah. They are:


Do not murder.
Do not steal.
Do not worship false gods.
Do not be sexually immoral.
Do not eat the limb of an animal before it is killed.
Do not curse God.
Set up courts and bring offenders to justice.

Maimonides explains that any human being who faithfully observes these laws earns a proper place in heaven. So you see, the Torah is for all humanity, no conversion necessary.

As well, when King Solomon built the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, he specifically asked God to heed the prayer of non-Jews who come to the Temple (1-Kings 8:41-43). The Temple was the universal center of spirituality, which the prophet Isaiah referred to as a "house for all nations." The service in the Holy Temple during the week of Sukkot featured a total of 70 bull offerings, corresponding to each of the 70 nations of the world. In fact, the Talmud says if the Romans would have realized how much they were benefiting from the Temple, they never would have destroyed it!

Today, there are many active groups of non-Jews called "B'nai Noach" who faithfully observe the Seven Laws of Noah.

There is an excellent book on the topic, called:
"The Path of the Righteous Gentile"
by Chaim Clorfene and Yakov Rogalsky.

See also:
"The Real Messiah: A Jewish Response to Missionaries"
by Aryeh Kaplan.

You may also want to view a B'nai Noach web site at: http://www.hamayim.org/.